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Title of the item:

Comparative studies on susceptibilities of two different Japanese isolates of Oncomelania nosophora to three strains of Schistosoma japonicum originating from Japan, China, and the Philippines.

Title :
Comparative studies on susceptibilities of two different Japanese isolates of Oncomelania nosophora to three strains of Schistosoma japonicum originating from Japan, China, and the Philippines.
Authors :
Kirinoki M; Department of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Mibu, Shimotsuga, Tochigi 321-0293, Japan.
Hu M
Yokoi H
Kawai S
Terrado R
Ilagan E
Chigusa Y
Sasaki Y
Matsuda H
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Source :
Parasitology [Parasitology] 2005 May; Vol. 130 (Pt 5), pp. 531-7.
Publication Type :
Comparative Study; Journal Article
Language :
English
Imprint Name(s) :
Original Publication: London, New York, Cambridge University Press.
MeSH Terms :
Host-Parasite Interactions/*physiology
Schistosoma japonicum/*physiology
Snails/*parasitology
Animals ; China ; Japan ; Larva/physiology ; Philippines
Entry Date(s) :
Date Created: 20050705 Date Completed: 20050728 Latest Revision: 20190818
Update Code :
20220301
DOI :
10.1017/s0031182004006924
PMID :
15991496
Academic Journal
Oncomelania nosophora (Gastropoda: Pomatiopsidae) is the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum in Japan. Although most of the snails were eliminated during the 20th century, they are still found in two areas in Japan. One area is in the Kofu Basin, including Nirasaki City, in Yamanashi Prefecture. The other is the Obitsu River Basin in Kisarazu City, Chiba Prefecture. Snails collected in Nirasaki and Kisarazu were exposed to 3 geographical strains of S. japonicum originating from Japan, China, and the Philippines. Both isolates of O. nosophora showed high susceptibility to the Japanese strain of S. japonicum (74.0% - 82.2%, for the Nirasaki isolate and 58.0% - 56.0% for the Kisarazu isolate) and low susceptibility to the Chinese strain (0.0% - 1.3% and 1.4% - 7.9% respectively). In contrast, the susceptibility of the snails to the Philippine strain was significantly different (P < 0.01) between the isolates (3.3% - 6.6% for the Nirasaki isolate and 31.9% - 75.9% for the Kisarazu isolate). To examine the differences in infectivity in detail, we conducted histological observations of snails exposed to the Philippine strain at 3 h, 1, 3, and 15 days after miracidial exposure. We found differences in the development of the parasite between the isolates of snails from early after exposure.

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