Informacja

Drogi użytkowniku, aplikacja do prawidłowego działania wymaga obsługi JavaScript. Proszę włącz obsługę JavaScript w Twojej przeglądarce.

Przeglądasz jako GOŚĆ
Tytuł pozycji:

'I'm proud of how far I've come. I'm just ready to work': mental health recovery narratives within the context of Australia's Disability Employment Services.

Tytuł :
'I'm proud of how far I've come. I'm just ready to work': mental health recovery narratives within the context of Australia's Disability Employment Services.
Autorzy :
Devine A; Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. .
Vaughan C; Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
Kavanagh A; Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
Dickinson H; Public Service Research Group, School of Business, University of New South Wales, Canberra, Australia.
Byars S; Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
Dimov S; Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
Gye B; Community Mental Health Australia, Sydney, Australia.
Brophy L; Centre for Mental Health, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.; Social Work and Social Policy, School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
Pokaż więcej
Źródło :
BMC public health [BMC Public Health] 2020 Mar 12; Vol. 20 (1), pp. 325. Date of Electronic Publication: 2020 Mar 12.
Typ publikacji :
Journal Article
Język :
English
Imprint Name(s) :
Original Publication: London : BioMed Central, [2001-
MeSH Terms :
Mental Health Recovery*
Narration*
Disabled Persons/*rehabilitation
Employment/*psychology
Adolescent ; Adult ; Australia ; Female ; Humans ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Surveys and Questionnaires ; Young Adult
References :
Community Ment Health J. 2005 Apr;41(2):141-58. (PMID: 15974495)
Psychiatr Serv. 2009 Aug;60(8):1024-31. (PMID: 19648188)
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2012 Aug;46(8):735-52. (PMID: 22696547)
Psychiatr Rehabil J. 2011 Winter;34(3):177-85. (PMID: 21208856)
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2014 Jul;48(7):644-53. (PMID: 24413806)
Am J Epidemiol. 2014 Jun 15;179(12):1467-76. (PMID: 24872351)
BMC Public Health. 2016 Feb 03;16:115. (PMID: 26847554)
Psychiatr Rehabil J. 2008 Summer;32(1):59-62. (PMID: 18614451)
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2017 Sep 12;9:CD011867. (PMID: 28898402)
Psychiatr Serv. 2011 Dec;62(12):1470-6. (PMID: 22193795)
Disabil Rehabil. 2015;37(9):820-4. (PMID: 25039621)
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2016 Jun;50(6):534-47. (PMID: 26466606)
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2006 May;40(5):471-7. (PMID: 16683974)
Disabil Health J. 2019 Oct;12(4):537-541. (PMID: 31235447)
Psychiatry Res. 2001 Dec 31;105(3):243-53. (PMID: 11814543)
BMC Public Health. 2016 Oct 31;16(Suppl 3):1042. (PMID: 28185560)
Australas Psychiatry. 2018 Dec;26(6):578-585. (PMID: 29457477)
Psychiatr Rehabil J. 2001 Spring;24(4):335-43. (PMID: 11406984)
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010 Jan 26;10:26. (PMID: 20102609)
BMC Public Health. 2015 Aug 20;15:805. (PMID: 26289668)
J Occup Rehabil. 2014 Sep;24(3):484-97. (PMID: 24114382)
Qual Health Res. 2018 May;28(6):1002-1015. (PMID: 29557294)
Psychiatr Serv. 2013 Oct;64(10):974-80. (PMID: 23820592)
World Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;13(1):12-20. (PMID: 24497237)
Psychol Med. 2013 Aug;43(8):1763-72. (PMID: 23190443)
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Nov;68(11):1064-71. (PMID: 25053615)
Psychiatr Serv. 2014 May 1;65(5):675-7. (PMID: 24535634)
BJPsych Adv. 2018 Sep;24(5):319-333. (PMID: 30174829)
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;58(4):417-24. (PMID: 21602221)
BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 02;16:687. (PMID: 27485322)
Am J Occup Ther. 2007 Sep-Oct;61(5):535-42. (PMID: 17944291)
Soc Sci Med. 2001 Nov;53(9):1247-57. (PMID: 11556614)
Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Aug 15;182(4):328-34. (PMID: 26138706)
PLoS One. 2019 Mar 28;14(3):e0214678. (PMID: 30921432)
Br J Psychiatry. 2011 Dec;199(6):445-52. (PMID: 22130746)
Aust Occup Ther J. 2015 Dec;62(6):378-92. (PMID: 26555561)
Grant Information :
150100077 Australian Research Council Linkages Project
Contributed Indexing :
Keywords: Disability employment services; Mental illness; Personal recovery; Psychosocial disability
Entry Date(s) :
Date Created: 20200314 Date Completed: 20200622 Latest Revision: 20200622
Update Code :
20201023
PubMed Central ID :
PMC7068916
DOI :
10.1186/s12889-020-8452-z
PMID :
32164650
Czasopismo naukowe
Background: Employment is recognised as facilitating the personal and clinical recovery of people with psychosocial disability. Yet this group continue to experience considerable barriers to work, and, constitute a significant proportion of individuals engaged with Disability Employment Services (DES). Recognition of the role of recovery-oriented practice within DES remains limited, despite these approaches being widely promoted as best-practice within the field of mental health.
Methods: The Improving Disability Employment Study (IDES) aims to gather evidence on factors influencing employment outcomes for Australians with disability. Descriptive analysis and linear regression of IDES survey data from 369 DES participants, alongside narrative analysis of data collected through 56 in-depth interviews with 30 DES participants with psychosocial disability, allowed us to explore factors influencing mental health, well-being and personal recovery within the context of DES.
Results: Psychosocial disability was reported as the main disability by 48% of IDES respondents. These individuals had significantly lower scores on measures of mental health and well-being (44.9, 48.4 respectively, p ≤ 0.01), compared with respondents with other disability types (52.2, 54.3 p ≤ 0.01). Within this group, individuals currently employed had higher mental health and well-being scores than those not employed (47.5 vs 36.9, 55.5 vs 45.4 respectively, p ≤ 0.01). Building on these findings, our qualitative analysis identified five personal recovery narratives: 1) Recovery in spite of DES; 2) DES as a key actor in recovery; 3) DES playing a supporting role in fluctuating journeys of recovery; 4) Recovery undermined by DES; and, 5) Just surviving regardless of DES. Narratives were strongly influenced by participants' mental health and employment status, alongside the relationship with their DES worker, and, participants' perspectives on the effectiveness of services provided.
Conclusion: These findings re-iterate the importance of work in supporting the mental health and well-being of people with psychosocial disability. Alongside access to secure and meaningful work, personal recovery was facilitated within the context of DES when frontline workers utilised approaches that align with recovery-orientated practices. However, these approaches were not consistently applied. Given the number of people with psychosocial disability moving through DES, encouraging greater consideration of recovery-oriented practice within DES and investment in building the capacity of frontline staff to utilise such practice is warranted.
Zaloguj się, aby uzyskać dostęp do pełnego tekstu.

Ta witryna wykorzystuje pliki cookies do przechowywania informacji na Twoim komputerze. Pliki cookies stosujemy w celu świadczenia usług na najwyższym poziomie, w tym w sposób dostosowany do indywidualnych potrzeb. Korzystanie z witryny bez zmiany ustawień dotyczących cookies oznacza, że będą one zamieszczane w Twoim komputerze. W każdym momencie możesz dokonać zmiany ustawień dotyczących cookies