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Title of the item:

Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy and Reduced Vision among Indigenous Australians in Top End Primary Care Health Services: a TEAMSnet Sub-study.

Title :
Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy and Reduced Vision among Indigenous Australians in Top End Primary Care Health Services: a TEAMSnet Sub-study.
Authors :
Quinn N; NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Yang F; NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Ryan C; NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Bursell SE; NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Keech A; NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Atkinson-Briggs S; Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Jenkins A; NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.; Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Brazionis L; Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
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Corporate Authors :
Centre of Research Excellence in Diabetic Retinopathy Study and TEAMSnet Study Groups; NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Source :
Internal medicine journal [Intern Med J] 2020 Nov 16. Date of Electronic Publication: 2020 Nov 16.
Publication Model :
Ahead of Print
Publication Type :
Journal Article
Language :
English
Imprint Name(s) :
Original Publication: Carlton, Vic. : Blackwell Science Asia, c2001-
Entry Date(s) :
Date Created: 20201116 Latest Revision: 20201202
Update Code :
20210210
DOI :
10.1111/imj.14971
PMID :
33196133
Academic Journal
Background: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) prevalence is higher in Indigenous Australians than in other Australians and is a major cause of vision loss. Consequently, timely screening and treatment is paramount, and annual eye screening is recommended for Indigenous Australians.
Aims: To assess the prevalence of DR, reduced vision, and DR treatment coverage among Indigenous Australian adults with diabetes attending Top End Indigenous primary care health services.
Methods: A cross-sectional DR screening study conducted from November 2013-December 2015 in two very remote Northern Territory Aboriginal primary healthcare services.
Results: In 287 subjects, the prevalence of non-proliferative DR, proliferative DR, and clinically significant diabetic macular oedema (CSMO) was 37.3%, 5.4% and 9.0%, respectively. Treatment coverage for PDR was 60% (of ten patients) and for CSMO was 17% (of 23 patients). Vision data were available from 122 participants at one site. The proportion with normal vision, reduced vision, impaired vision and blindness was 31.1%, 52.5%, 15.6% and 0.8%, respectively. Overall, ungradable monocular image sets (46%) were associated with poorer quality images and missing protocol images (both p < 0.001). Ungradable images for DR were associated with presence of small pupils/media opacities (p < 0.001). Ungradable images for diabetic macular oedema were associated with poorer image quality (p < 0.001), cataracts (p < 0.001), and small pupils (p = 0.04).
Conclusions: A high prevalence of DR, CSMO and impaired vision was noted in Indigenous Australians with diabetes. Screening in primary care is feasible, but more effective screening methods are needed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
(This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.)

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