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Title of the item:

Weight Change and the Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Metabolically Healthy Overweight Individuals.

Title :
Weight Change and the Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Metabolically Healthy Overweight Individuals.
Authors :
Cho IY; Department of Family Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
Chang Y; Center for Cohort Studies, Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Clinical Research Design and Evaluation, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
Sung E; Department of Family Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Center for Cohort Studies, Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: .
Kang JH; Department of Family Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
Shin H; Department of Family Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Center for Cohort Studies, Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
Wild SH; Usher Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Byrne CD; Nutrition and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom; National Institute for Health Research Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom.
Ryu S; Center for Cohort Studies, Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Clinical Research Design and Evaluation, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: .
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Source :
Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association [Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol] 2021 Apr 28. Date of Electronic Publication: 2021 Apr 28.
Publication Model :
Ahead of Print
Publication Type :
Journal Article
Language :
English
Imprint Name(s) :
Original Publication: Philadelphia, PA : W.B. Saunders for the American Gastroenterological Association, 2003-
Contributed Indexing :
Keywords: Body Mass Index; Metabolically Healthy Obesity; Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease; Obesity; Overweight
Entry Date(s) :
Date Created: 20210430 Latest Revision: 20210724
Update Code :
20210914
DOI :
10.1016/j.cgh.2021.04.037
PMID :
33930552
Academic Journal
Introduction: The study sought to investigate the effect of weight change on hepatic steatosis (HS) incidence with or without liver fibrosis in metabolically healthy overweight or obese individuals.
Methods: A cohort of 14,779 metabolically healthy men and women who were overweight or obese (body mass index ≥23 kg/m 2 ) and free from HS and an intermediate or high probability of fibrosis at baseline were followed for a median of 5.2 years. Metabolic health was defined as freedom from the components of metabolic syndrome and a homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance <2.5. Weight changes were calculated as differences from baseline at the next subsequent visit. The outcome was HS incidence, with or without liver fibrosis, as assessed by liver ultrasound and 2 noninvasive fibrosis scores.
Results: During 76,794.6 person-years of follow-up, 3539 cases of HS incidence were identified. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for HS incidence by weight change group, <-5.0%, -5.0%-1.0%, 1.0%-5.0%, and >5.0%, relative to the no weight change group (-0.9% to 0.9%) were 0.52 (0.44-0.60), 0.83 (0.75-0.92), 1.21 (1.10-1.33), and 1.51 (1.36-1.69), respectively. Clinically relevant weight loss of >5% was also associated with a lowered risk of HS with intermediate or high probability of advanced fibrosis. In mediation analyses, associations remained significant, although adjustment for metabolic risk factors was attenuating.
Discussion: Clinically relevant weight loss was associated with a reduced risk of developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with or without intermediate or high probability of advanced fibrosis in metabolically healthy overweight or obese individuals.
(Copyright © 2021 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.)

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