Information

Dear user, the application need JavaScript support. Please enable JavaScript in your browser.

You are browsing as a GUEST
Title of the item:

Chronotype, Sleep, and Depressive Symptoms Among Chinese College Students: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Title :
Chronotype, Sleep, and Depressive Symptoms Among Chinese College Students: A Cross-Sectional Study.
Authors :
Li, Tingting
Xie, Yang
Tao, Shuman
Yang, Yajuan
Xu, Honglv
Zou, Liwei
Tao, Fangbiao
Wu, Xiaoyan
Show more
Subject Terms :
MENTAL depression
COLLEGE students
CROSS-sectional method
SLEEP
DEMOGRAPHIC characteristics
Source :
Frontiers in Neurology; 12/17/2020, Vol. 11, pN.PAG-N.PAG, 7p
Geographic Terms :
JIANGXI Sheng (China)
ANHUI Sheng (China)
Academic Journal
Objective: To describe the prevalence of chronotype and depressive symptoms among Chinese college students and to examine the association between chronotype and depressive symptoms. Methods: From April to May 2019, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1,179 Chinese college students from 2 universities in Anhui and Jiangxi provinces. A total of 1,135 valid questionnaires were collected, the valid response rate was 98.6%. The questionnaire investigated age, gender, major, height, weight, only child status, living place, self-reported family economy, and self-reported study burden. The chronotype was assessed by the Morning and Evening Questionnaire (MEQ). Depressive symptoms and sleep quality were evaluated by the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), respectively. A Chi-square test was used to examine the proportion of depressive symptoms among Chinese college students with different demographic characteristics. The generalized linear model was used to analyze the relationships between chronotype and depressive symptoms. Results: The proportion of morning types (M-types), neutral types (N-types), and evening types (E-types) of college students were 18.4, 71.1, and 10.5%, respectively. The proportion of mild depression, moderate depression, and moderate to severe depression of participants were 32.4, 6.0, and 4.2%, respectively. Compared to the M-types, after controlled for age, gender, major, sleep quality, self-reported study burden, father's education level, and self-reported family economy, depressive symptoms were positively correlated with E-types (OR = 2.36, 95% CI: 1.49–3.73). Conclusions: There was a significant association between chronotype and depressive symptoms among Chinese college students. Further longitudinal studies were needed to clarify the causal relationship between chronotype and depressive symptoms. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Copyright of Frontiers in Neurology is the property of Frontiers Media S.A. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

We use cookies to help identify your computer so we can tailor your user experience, track shopping basket contents and remember where you are in the order process.