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Title of the item:

Dental disease in alpacas. Part 2: Risk factors associated with diastemata, periodontitis, occlusal pulp exposure, wear abnormalities, and malpositioned teeth

Title :
Dental disease in alpacas. Part 2: Risk factors associated with diastemata, periodontitis, occlusal pulp exposure, wear abnormalities, and malpositioned teeth
Authors :
Kirsten Proost
Bart Pardon
Elke Pollaris
Thijs Flahou
Lieven Vlaminck
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Subject Terms :
apical infection
dental abnormalities
dental disease
dental pathology
New World camelids
tooth root abscesses
Veterinary medicine
SF600-1100
Source :
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Vol 34, Iss 2, Pp 1039-1046 (2020)
Publisher :
Wiley, 2020.
Publication Year :
2020
Collection :
LCC:Veterinary medicine
Document Type :
article
File Description :
electronic resource
Language :
English
ISSN :
1939-1676
0891-6640
Relation :
https://doaj.org/toc/0891-6640; https://doaj.org/toc/1939-1676
DOI :
10.1111/jvim.15740
Access URL :
https://doaj.org/article/e3556fdb347c45cfac9d164640149577
Accession Number :
edsdoj.3556fdb347c45cfac9d164640149577
Academic Journal
Abstract Background Dental disorders, of which tooth root abscesses are best documented, are highly prevalent in alpacas. Identification of risk factors can be valuable for prevention of dental disorders in this species. Hypothesis/Objectives To identify risk factors associated with wear abnormalities, malpositioning, diastemata, periodontal disease (PD), and occlusal pulp exposure at the level of the cheek teeth. Animals Two hundred twenty‐eight alpacas (Vicugna pacos) from 25 farms. Methods Cross‐sectional study. Dental examinations were performed on sedated animals. Risk factors were determined by clinical examination and interview. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for wear abnormalities, malpositioned teeth, diastemata, PD, and occlusal pulp exposure. Results Mandibular swelling was significantly associated with PD (odds ratio [OR], 11.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.27‐48.81; P

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